My Not-so-smart use of my Smart Phone: Balancing Technology and Parenting

It started completely innocent and justified. It was 3am and my four day old had been awake for the umpteenth time. It was a frustrating 30-minutes of him crying to get him latched on and I was frustrated, tired, and in pain. I needed something to get my mind off of it all (and mostly to try to keep me awake while I nursed him). I powered up the Smart Phone screen and navigated through email, Facebook, Google Reader, and Diaper Swappers. Before I knew it, the feeding was over and it was time to crash once again. Hmmm, that flew by.

This became my go-to routine every time I breastfed. I even added Pinterest and my Kindle app as supplementing made the feedings go longer.  One day, while waiting for my Diaper Swappers screen to refresh, I looked down and the moment happened. He did the thing I had been waiting for that I heard other breastfeeding Moms talk about: he looked up at me and paused his feeding to flash me a huge grin. I loved it, soaked it up for a second, but then Diaper Swappers loaded up again and as he went back to eat, I went back to work.

This got me thinking: what the heck is my phone doing to my relationship with my two children?

Which image looks happiest to you?

Given my low supply issues, the ONLY reason why I am breastfeeding is for the skin-to-skin bonding opportunity, which is why my actions are so contradictory. The only reason for why I am breastfeeding is for that connection. But the connection is a two way street, and I have taken a serious detour.

I decided to commit to put the phone down a little more often and soak up my little guy. Can I just confess that this was really tough to do? The hardest for me is when he is up every two hours (not to mention when the toddler is up) and I am frustrated and tired and feel like I need something to help me out a little bit.
But this process made me realize that media use and parenting doesn’t have to be an all-or-nothing thing. As I have tried to find this delicate balance of media use  vs. Mommy and Baby time, I have come up with a few tips that have been helpful:


1) Follow the gut. I am convinced that women are built with a gut with a conscience buried in it that grumbles or purrs if we are going off course. I am learning to pay attention to this gut because it seems to growl loudest when I am not spending enough time focusing on my children. There are definitely times when I use my Smart Phone while feeding my little guy, but I have tried to get out of the habit of constantly grabbing the phone every time it was feeding time. Now I listen to my gut, it usually tells me when I should be putting that phone down.


2) Dedicate special time for bonding If I need to use the phone while feeding, it is a must that I set the phone down at the end of the feeding and stroke my little guy’s hair and kiss his cheek and head. When little guy goes down for his mid-day nap and my oldest and I are up, I immediately want to bolt to my laptop to see if someone has filled out a new survey on this site (yes, I really do that), but now I take some time to play with her. I make sure that each child has very special one-on-one time with me every day.


3) Look at what other Moms are doing.  I have improved SO MUCH as a Mom by looking to others for inspiration. Some of my favorite blog Moms are Shawna and Nie Nie. And don’t even get me started on in-person friends I admire. These women help shape me to be someone better. I think I am far more likely to say, “I admire how she spends her morning at the park with her kids” as opposed to, “Wow, check out her stellar play on Angry Birds.”  I have to be careful when doing this because sometimes I forget that the beauty of the internet is that you can OMIT parenting mistakes, therefore I assume that a lot of Moms out there are near perfect and therefore I beat myself up. So I am learning that healthy balance of emulating others, without diminishing myself.


4) Unplug Everyone. When I need to cook dinner, instead of putting the babies in front of the TV, I now have them in the kitchen and describe what I am doing as I live out my secret life-long dream: being a TV chef. Yum-O. Earlier today I had a cartoon going and was hesitant to turn it off because I thought daughter would meltdown–I did it anyway and I had the most beautiful moment with her, we played classical music and she brought book after book out for me to read.

5) Spend time building memories. Instead of staring at a screen, I spend a lot more time thinking about my children. I think about what I love about them. These early baby years are so brief, but so special. Inspired by Styleberryblog’s 52 week project, I decided to pick something every week that I don’t ever want to forget about each of my two kids (like this week, it is how the 2-year old calls her Jellies shoes her “Jell-Os” or how little man likes to sneak one little hand out of his sleep sack). I take a nice picture of it, write about it, and maybe one day I will have a nice book of unforgettables. I’d say that is some pretty productive use of time.

6) Devote time to it. I don’t think Smart Phone or media use is bad, I just know that in my case it is simply misplaced. I am not doing it at the right times. Now I follow my gut on things, but I also dedicate a small amount of time each evening to email, facebook, blog, etc. I love this “me” time. I feel ready and eager to give my kids their much deserved and needed “Mommy and Me” time.

I genuinely feel like I know when I am starting to go off course on things like this, I just often ignore what knowledge. What is important is staying in tune to that voice instead of drowning it out with tweets.

What are your thoughts on this? How has media had an impact on your parenting (for good or bad)?

Tara Porter

Tara Porter began using cloth diapers in 2011 when she felt that using disposable diapers was costing too much money. The problem was, a lot of the highly recommended diapers weren’t working for her baby. What she finally discovered was that her baby was skinny and a heavy wetter, and that diapers worked differently for those baby types. Because of her professional work with survey design and statistics, she designed Padded Tush Stats as a way to determine how different cloth diapers worked on different babies.

Tara moved on to other career endeavors in 2014 but can still be found online blogging about health and fitness at Fit Baby Steps.